Addie worked at a Botanical Garden in Columbus for a time and knows ‘…all things flowers.’ She is pictured here at the couple’s 5-acre-farm. (Photo Submitted/Putnam County Master Gardeners Club)
Addie worked at a Botanical Garden in Columbus for a time and knows ‘…all things flowers.’ She is pictured here at the couple’s 5-acre-farm. (Photo Submitted/Putnam County Master Gardeners Club)

COLUMBUS GROVE - Two relatively new members of the Putnam County Master Gardeners Club are parlaying their expertise to create one of the more unique 5-acre-farms in the area.

Wild Vine Farm on Route 65, just south of Columbus Grove, offers a mix of micro-greens, regular chemical-free produce, and, oh yeah, flowers. LOTS of flowers.

Eduardo Sguerra said his wife, Addie, is about ‘…all things flowers.’ She worked for several years in the Botanical Garden at Columbus’s Franklin Park Conservatory. So, Addie knows flowers.

And Wild Vine has zinnias, snap dragons, daisies… you name it. What’s more, it’s a “U-Pick-It-Flower-Farm.” In addition, Eduardo said he and Addie also do all sorts of creative “flower arrangements” for weddings, birthdays, funerals…

And to keep the afore-mentioned funerals as far off as possible, Wild Vine also sells a variety of micro-greens. Microgreens are young vegetable greens that fall somewhere between sprouts and baby leaf vegetables. They have a tremendously high nutrient content.

Some of Wild Vine’s micro-greens include lettuce, kale, spinach… In addition, the produce they grow in general is all chemical free.

Eduardo said healthy eating fortifies the immune system, and, in turn, studies show this cuts down on health problems.

That simple.

What’s not simple, Eduardo continued, is the agricultural paradigm that has evolved in this country of late. That is, bigger and bigger corporate farms, growing at tremendously high volumes, and then trucking this produce thousands of miles.

Conversely, in the past, it used to be much more about local farmers growing for local people. With this loop, camaraderie between the farmers and the community was stronger. And there was much less of a carbon footprint.

And there was a thing called “seasonal eating.” That is, when strawberries were in season locally, you ate strawberries. Eduardo added that all across the country, there is a Back to the Land movement intended to move our agriculture paradigm back to a slower more decentralized one – like it was in the old days.