World War II veteran Ray Woods along with friends David Fricke and Betty Wannemacher has questions for Bruce Stowe about his exhibit at the Putnam County Historical Museum in Kalida. (Putnam Sentinel/Nancy Kline)
World War II veteran Ray Woods along with friends David Fricke and Betty Wannemacher has questions for Bruce Stowe about his exhibit at the Putnam County Historical Museum in Kalida. (Putnam Sentinel/Nancy Kline)

KALIDA – Veterans from World War 2, the Korean war and the Vietnam War were among the guests in attendance during the 100th anniversary of Armistice Day program held Sunday at the Putnam County Historical Museum in Kalida.

A variety of speakers and music was provided during the music to commemorate the day. It was the surprise vocalist at the end of the program though that captured everyone’s attention.

Elementary student Sawyer Wardzala, grandson of the museum’s curator, Carol Wise, asked if he could sing the song he sang at his school for Veteran’s Day.

With the flag reflected by a protector on his face. Sawyer sang a song thanking the veterans for what they do and how it made so he could sleep safe at night.

“He felt very happy to be part of the program,” said Sawyer’s aunt, Kira Davis.

Randy Basinger spoke on the home front during World War 1 about the Putnam County residents who died during this war. He also talked about farmers mainly using horses to do the farming during this era and how saving grease from cooking to use for fuel was part of the war effort.

Jared Horstman told the history the Armistice Day and Veteran’s Day and Board President Millie Ruen held up artifacts from World War I and explained their purpose during the war.

America’s White Table was set up at the front of the room. The White Table is set in many military places as a symbol for and remembrance to service members fallen, missing, or held captive in the line of duty. Solitary and solemn, it is the table where no one will ever sit. Vice President Janis Lentz read the poem about symbolism of the White Table.

Music was provided by Lori Ann Hemenway and Kristen Wardzala. The music was sung during World War I.

Flag lapel pins were given to all the veterans at the program.

The main part of the museum had a special display of World War I uniforms, pictures and other memorabilia was set up. This display will remain in place until the end of the year.

It was also announced the Historical Society will be transforming the entire ramp room into a display of all military items during 2019. A fundraiser for this will begin early next year. The funds raised will be used to purchase special curtains and filters for the windows to protect the uniforms, display boards for the walls and display cases. All of this is to protect the memorabilia and uniforms for future generations.

The Museum is open 9 a.m. to noon on Wednesdays and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Sundays.